Skip to main content

Cabarrus Magazine

'Up Front' Releases Special Edition with Guest, Rep. Richard Hudson

Apr 01, 2020 10:20AM ● By Jason Huddle

Special COVID-19 Edition: A Conversation with Rep. Richard Hudson

Huddle
Welcome to this special edition of Up Front with Cabarrus Magazine. A presentation of Cabco Media Group and sponsored by Atlantic Bay Mortgage Group, Cabarrus Arena and Events Center, Cabarrus Eye Center, Certec Automotive. The Circle World of Wellness for women, Code Ninjas, Concord Downtown Development Corporation, Family Wealth Partners, New Hope Worship Center and Walk Cabarrus. I'm your host, Jason Huddle. Welcome, my friends. As you well know, we released our regular podcast for the week yesterday, and we appreciate Pastor Dale Jenkins coming on for that. But also yesterday I was given the opportunity to interview Congressman Richard Hudson, and I had originally planned on doing that interview and then releasing it next week on our podcast. However, because of the fluidity of the entire situation with the announcement that Cabarrus County would be a shelter at Home County this week as well as everything always changing and even from the interview, you'll hear us talk about the vote for the stimulus bill that the House was getting ready to do. Of course, now you know it has passed, and so we don't have to worry about that not happening. But I felt it was important to go ahead and get this episode up. And also I still owed my sponsors an extra episode from February. So it was a great opportunity to make this up to them, but also keep you guys in the know Congressman Hudson and I had a great conversation and I was so excited about this interview, I could not wait a week for you guys to hear it. I won't do shameless plug time because I know you guys want to get to this interview, so I'm going to go to break and we come back. We will have Congressman Richard Hudson on the line. Stay tuned.

Commerical
s
                
Huddle                 
Welcome back to Up Front with Cabarrus Magazine this special addition we have on the line, Congressman Richard Hudson. He represents the eighth District of North Carolina, and that is most of Cabarrus County. Congressman thank you so much for calling in and being on the program today.

Hudson
                 
Hey, Jason great to be with you again, thank you.

Huddle
                 
Yeah. Thank you. I forgot to mention that you had been on the program before, and this is different circumstances. Last time we were talking about programs for veterans. This time it's a little more a little more pressing.

Hudson
                 
Definitely challenging times of course, no question about that.

Huddle
                 
So let's just get into first of all, as far as the district is concerned, how satisfied are you with local governments? Reactions and federal government reaction is as far as dealing with our district's specifically?

Hudson
                 
Well, I appreciate that Jason. You know, these are unprecedented times. As you said, we've never dealt with a crisis like this. You know, I think you could look back 100 years ago, we had a Spanish flu pandemic. That may be similar, but but certainly in my lifetime I've never seen anything like this and I've been very proud of the leadership President Donald Trump has shown. I've been really impressed with our local officials. I`ve remained in constant contact with the president with Governor Cooper with our legislators early on we were in touch with our public health department officials our hospitals our VA medical center, just making sure they've got the resources they need. They were able to identify some concerns early on that we were able to reach out to the governor and work on. We joined Senator Tillis and Congressman David Price who`s a Democrat from up in the triangle area, a letter to the administration early on saying, We don't have enough test kits in North Carolina and we don't have enough protective equipment for our medical providers and asking for them to help us get more resources, so we've been in constant communication with our local folks, I believe they've been doing tremendous work, especially our health care and health folks. You know, this is this is a non precedent crisis and you know, theres people feeling real pain out there. There's a lot of fear, but folks listening can rest assured that your state, local and federal officials are all working together to do everything we can to deal with this crisis.

Huddle
                 
I want to put a pin in the protective equipment because we're gonna get back to that in a second. But I do want to ask you about the mortality rate versus the reaction that we've gotten. There are a lot of people out there that say, look, the mortality rate on this thing's about 1.5%. Last I checked does this reaction this extreme reaction which we've never seen before in this country ever does this extreme reaction? Is it justified given the threat of this particular virus?

Hudson
                 
You know, that's a question, Jason. I've wrestled with as well throughout this process, and I think it was a lot. Obviously we don't know about this virus, you know, China uh, kept it hidden from the world and has continued to hide information and not be complete transparent about what they were seeing with the cases in their country. We've gotten a lot better data from South Korea, Italy, other places. So we're learning a lot about this virus. But I would say that we're not overreacting. You know, I've heard some people say this is just a really bad flu, Uh, that you know, the instant loss of life the mortality rate is maybe even be lower than flu. There was a paper, ah, peer reviewed paper put out by Stanford professor in the last couple days, saying that they believe the the mortality rates will actually be lower than the flu. But even if that's true, the way this virus spread so quickly, it's, uh, it's spreads much faster than other viruses we've seen. And the way it attacks the lungs is unique. And folks with underlying medical conditions, especially if they have lung issues. Seniors are particularly at risk from this virus. And if you look at what happened in Italy, how fast this spread, you know, the Lombardy region of Italy is completely shut down. They've got yeah, thousands of folks with us that they've got just, you know, scary numbers of deaths. Italy is much smaller than the US, our rate of infection is on the same sort of trajectory as Italy. If you multiply that out by how many citizens we have in this country, we're talking about huge loss of life. And if we hadn't taken the steps we've taken to ask people shelter in place to instill social distancing. You know, the different measures we`ve taken. If we hadn't done that, we would be just like Italy and we would be talking about hundreds of thousands of Americans dying from this virus. So we're not seeing that, and I'm hopeful that we will soon see a decline in the number of new cases. There's some evidence that we're seeing a decline in the rate of increase in new cases, which is good news, but but my hope is we'll see a decline in the new cases of people infected by this, which will show that what we're doing is working. What we're trying to do is buy time for us to get more protective equipment and ventilators and things to our hospitals before this thing becomes widespread, to give more time to get treatments. There many treatments out there now being tested, their many vaccines already and you're being tested. But it's gonna take time to get those to where people can have widespread access to him. And so we're trying to buy time, Uh, for those things, too get in the place and so I don't think we've overacted, I do have concerns about communities that are shutting down entire communities and ordering people to stay at home. I do worry about maybe that going too far in some cases, but discussion places like Washington State and up in New York, where you're seeing they're kind of the epicenters off this outbreak in America. I think the measures were taken are gonna pay off in long run.

Huddle
                 
I get where you're coming from but do you think we're setting a dangerous precedent for future infections? As soon as something hits, everything gets shut down and the economy takes another hit. Is that where we're looking towards for the next time?

Hudson
                 
Well, hope not. And you know, that's one thing I wrestle with is what are we giving up in terms of our freedom and our civil liberties in return for safety and protection? As a conservative, I'm always one whos skeptical of giving up our freedoms, and so it's a good question and its a question. We need to continue to ask, but I don't think we've put ourselves on a slippery slope for now. Everytime there's some new virus or some new bug out there we're gonna, you know, see the government take over. I think there have been people like Mayor de Blasio up in New York City and others who have made suggestions that do you go to far. de Blasio at one point said, We oughta have the federal government takeover every company in America that makes medical equipment. I think that's a mistake, I think that would definitely be going too far. I think the approach the president's taking the right approach, which is to invoke the powers he has to call on industry To to switch over to making the types of equipment we need, whether it's mask or gloves or gowns or ventilators, but not to actually take that step where we, you know, the federal government takes over private industry, and I think that would be going too far. So it's a really good question. It's important question that, frankly, we start asking after 9/11 how much are we willing to give up off of our liberty to the government so they can protect us? And again, that has a conservative? My answer is not much and we need to make sure we're protecting our freedoms and our abilities to that are protected. Our freedoms are protected on the Constitution, our ability to exercise our rights as Americans, we have to be very, uh, vigilant about defending those rights and not going to far.

Huddle
                 
Congressman I have some questions from some listeners of the show for you, but before I get to that, I just have one more question from myself. It seems like whenever things like this happen, the Congress tends to get into a reactionary mode, and my question is always the same. You know, this is the United States of America. It seems like we have contingency plans for our contingency plans. So why? When something like this happens and I granted, it's unprecedented. But why? When something like this happens, are we always scrambling at the last second to figure out what we're gonna do to help stimulate the economy or, you know, get people to stay in their homes? Where we figuring this out now? Why aren't these contingency plans already in place and our people in Congress talking about Okay, We need to have our stuff together the next time this happens.

Hudson
                 
It's a great question, and you know, it's unfortunate answer is often times it takes a crisis to get the federal government to move. And you know, our founding father set up a system of government with checks and balances. Uh, that's important to preserve our liberties, but it could be very inefficient on very hard to change and do things that we need to do. For example, I've been working on this issue of our supply chain for our pharmaceuticals before years. Now I've even got Democrats that are working with me on it. It's been kind of a bipartisan issue. We've tried to raise the awareness level of our colleagues in Congress about the fact that almost all the pharmaceuticals we make in America have ingredients that come from places like China, and many of them come from China and a lot of the medications, the medical equipment, different things that you're hearing about shortages now oh, are manufactured in China, and we ought to have a manufacturer here, and so you know, that's an issue I've been working on. But until now, we really haven't had a consensus in Congress to do something about it. I'm hopeful that now enough people woken up that that we can make that change. You know, we passed legislation that actually Senator Richard Burr wrote a couple of years ago called the Pandemic all prepared this act, Papa. And it basically provides resource in the government procedures from the federal government to deal with pandemics. And so we've gotten a little bit better. That legislation was extremely helpful and it moved us forward. But I think we've learned from this crisis it wasn't far enough. I think there are other questions like our national stockpile. We have a national stockpile of protective medical equipment and other things to use in a crisis like this. I'm not sure that stockpile was replenished after the H1N1 . And so you know, there's a question. Why did President Obama not resupply, refilled the stockpile after he used it down during H1N1? And why, as Congress not realize that was a problem, Why did the Trump administration not see that as a problem before we got to this pandemic? So I mean, I think there are a lot of questions that we're gonna be asking now, and I think we'll have the ability to make some changes going forward. But it's just It is frustrating, frustrating for me. I know it's frustrating for our listeners that it often time takes a crisis before we'll make some of these changes.

Huddle
                 
Stick around for Part two of my interview with Congressman Richard Hudson coming up right after these messages.

Commericals
                 

Huddle
                 
Congressman Let's get to some questions here for I have one regarding small businesses with the new stimulus package, which, as we're recording this, you're set to vote tomorrow on to officially approve it, and we don't anticipate any problems with that. But he's asking about the likelihood that 57 million self employed people would not qualify for aid. Is that true?
Hudson                 
Uh, that is not true, self employed folks and independent contractors like uber drivers and your gig economy workers can receive unemployment during this public health emergency. This bill also includes support to state, local governments and nonprofits as well so it does cover self employed people. There's also a loan program set up through the Small Business Administration. In this legislation called 7A loans, uh, 7A refers to the tax code of lenders. And so what it basically means is, if you're a small business or if your self employed person you can go to the lending institution that you normally do business with. And they will be authorized by the secretary of the Treasury to administer a small business loan to you. If you use that small business loan for payroll and rent or mortgage certain business expenses on and you have less than 500 employees, that money becomes a grant and you don't have to pay that loan back. So that's that's a pretty good program. There's also available to our self employed folks.

Huddle
                 
You touched on this a little bit earlier, but I want to go ahead and ask again. People like Ed Snowden predicted that the government would slowly try to take away everyone's rights, and it seems like this has sort of almost been an overnight thing. Ah, and I know you mentioned that before. I know that you are a conservative, that you are very much for limited government, and it seems to me it's getting harder and harder to enforce these stay at home proclamations without entertaining the idea of utilizing the National Guard, which means martial law. Are we headed that way? And what are your feelings on that?

Hudson
                 
Well, I hope we`re not headed that way. You know the president has resisted calls to have some kind of national locked down. You know, there were some rumors going around a week ago that that was gonna happen, But the president has said he's not interested in doing that. There are governors in certain states who has instituted state home policies. I'm not sure those have been warranted in every case. You may be in the case in New York, where they're kind of the epicenter right now, but places like West Virginia. I'm not sure that makes sense, you know, as a civil libertarian, as a conservative, I'm always skeptical of government getting more power. I do believe that left unchecked, government will eat up all of our powers. That's why the Constitution so important, because it protects our God given liberties. That's why we have to be vigilant, especially in times when people are panicked and and there might be popular support for the government taking more control, as I mentioned earlier. Same thing happened after 9/11 where people said, do whatever it takes to go get terrorists. Well, hold on a minute you know.  We want to make sure that we're not giving the government the tools it needs to take away all of our liberties, and I think that's the same case years. Look, there are certain common sense measures that municipalities and states have the authority to do, like shelter in place policies like shutting down certain businesses. I'm not a big fan of those, but I do see the value given the types of outbreaks were seeing that that tool is one that I understand they have. And then they ought to have. I think it needs to be used very sparingly, and I think we have citizens need to be very skeptical when it is used in, and I certainly would not support expanding the ability of government to do things like that. One of my concerns is I'm seeing in some places local government saying they're not gonna allow any more concealed carry permits or they're not gonna process pistol permits in some places. And that is concerning to me because you we shouldn't go to use on emergency a crisis like this to infringe on people's constitutional rights.

Huddle
                 
That was my next question. I was going to say Isn't that unconstitutional for them to do that?

Hudson
                 
I believe it is. And I've actually When the sheriff in Wake County announced that they weren't gonna process anymore pistol permits, I actually wrote a letter pointed out that that is unconstitutional and ask him not to do that. I've heard the sheriff in Cumberland County may have be doing the same thing, and we're looking into that. If that's the case, I intend to reach out to the sheriff and let him know that that's a violation of Constitution. And, uh and so you know, we've got to be vigilant, we've got to stand up and push back. And a zone elected official, I think, is my responsibility to make sure we're not ceding too much power to the government.

Hudson
                 
But it's a great question. And you know, I'm someone who believes we auto have manufacturing here in America and particularly of things like I mentioned pharmaceuticals before, but also protective equipment. There are a number of things that I think it's a national security interest for us to make here at home because we don't want someone like China. For example, in the future, we'll say China decided they wanted Thio invade Taiwan, and you know, we've got a treaty with our on that will protect him. But if China could say, Well, we'll turn off all your pharmaceuticals will turn off all your personal protective equipment, We'll turn off all of this or that that you needed for your manufacturing industrial base. Then they've got incredible leverage over us. And so this is an issue I've been working on for a long time now in the pharmaceutical space, but also several of us have been put a group together. We've been talking about this issue of what does then is would it take to get industry to bring supply chain back to the U. S. Meaning? How can we get industry to make masks here? Could we get the industry to make pharmaceuticals here. The ingredients from Suze. How can we get them to manufacture things here? What incentives would companies need to bring the supply chains back? There's actually legislation has been introduced by Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas that deals with that. I call it the Carrot, but he also has a stick. One of these, he's saying, is that by a certain date in the future, all federal agencies will not be allowed to buy anything that's manufactured in China. And I kind of like the sound of that. I like that idea. But in practical terms, I think it makes more sense to ask the question the other way, which is, what can we do to incentivize our businesses, to buy things that are made here or to make things here? Because again, it's the national security issue that I've talked about, but it's also jobs. I won't almost have those manufacturing jobs right here in comparison county right here in North Carolina. So I'm looking at Senator Cotton's legislation and looking at introducing something in the house side, having discussions with some of my colleagues here in the house about this idea of you. Can we expand the Berry Amendment, which says the department defense has to buy things made in America unless there's some kind of emergency, something that Congressman Hayes and Congressman Kissel worked on for years on, something we're continued to work on. But you know what? If we said bar defense bar in a state, other agencies, there, certain items that you have to purchase them in America, What that would do is create a market right away for American producers, which would give them a signal that it's worth the risk of borrowing the money to build the facilities, to hire the people, because you know you're gonna have a marketplace and so so that you know, that's something that I think we need to work on. But I think it's something that you know. Like I said before, another question. Now that people have seen this crisis, now that some people that didn't understand this before his eyes have been opened, I think we've got maybe an opportunity to make a change and bring some of those jobs back here to America.

Huddle
                 
Congressman, I know I need to wrap up with you. Let me ask a couple more questions. In closing here related to the stimulus package. First of all when can people realistically expect to receive a stimulus check? And as far as the businesses were concerned, when can they expect to hear back if they have applied for these loans through the SBA or their institutions, when can they expect to get some answers back as to how much they can get and when they can get it

Hudson
                 
Those are  great questions I've heard? I don't know this for sure. We'll try to get a separation out spokes, but I'm hearing that folks could expect those individual checks out in April so pretty quickly, as far as the loans again, I was on the phone with Secretary Mnuchin last night and ask this question about how quickly we can get these loans moving. Hey said that that he's gonna write the regulations very quickly, and his intent is that within weeks on, individual can go to their their lender that they normally deal with. That lender can provide them with a application, and they could know within hours whether they're approved or not, because these air government backed loans government guaranteed loans and they'll be running through the 7A institutions, which are your local banks and credit unions, and these are folks that in most cases on small businesses already have great it's relationships with. And so I think that we're talking about a matter of weeks before we get those loans out. I would say the folks listening If you're a small business owner, go and start talking your lender now the weight. Good start those conversations because we've been sharing this information with the financial service industry. As we've been going along, they're gonna be aware of these programs were actually waiting on the regulations. But instead of going through a month long regulation process that the secretary of Treasury has indicated he's gonna get the structures out very quickly, and their hope is to have a very simple process so that folks will know they're approved for these loans pretty quickly because they had the ideas. We want to get cash flow immediately to small businesses so that small businesses can keep their folks on the payroll and can can keep Going through these several months will be

Huddle
                 
Congressman Richard Hudson. Thank you so much for spending some time with us today. on the program. Appreciate all you're doing for our district. And we hopefully we'll talk to you on the back side of this when the dust is settled and the economy is back up and going. In the meantime, say hello to Pelosi for us.

Hudson
                 
Well if I see her. I appreciate you so much, Jason. Pleasure be with you.

Huddle
                 
Thank you, Congressman. You Ah, you have a great day and we'll talk to you soon.

Hudson
                 
All right. Stay safe. Wash your hands. Social distancing.

Huddle
                 
Yes, sir.  

Commericals
                 

Huddle
                 
I want to thank Congressman Hudson for coming on with us. I hope that you heard all the information that he gave us. There are a lot of things floating around on social media. That is contrary to the truth. And I wanted you guys to hear this information from somebody who is on the front lines in the political realm, who is getting firsthand reports on what is going on with this crisis and what we can expect in the coming weeks. Once again, I want to thank our sponsors. Atlantic Bay Mortgage Group, Cabarrus Arena and Events Center, Cabarrus Eye Center, Certec Automotive. The Circle A World of Wellness for women, Code Ninjas, Concord Downtown Development Corporation, Family Wealth Partners, New Hope Worship Center and Walk Cabarrus. As always, please remember to support those that support us. I appreciate you tuning in to this special edition of Up Front with Cabarrus magazine. You guys stay safe, wash your hands of the congressman said, and we'll see you next week.

Like what you're reading? Subscribe to Cabarrus Magazine's free newsletter to catch every headline