Skip to main content

Cabarrus Magazine

Homeschooling Expert has Tips for Frazzled Parents on latest 'Up Front' Episode

Apr 07, 2020 10:29AM ● By Jason Huddle

Help! I'm not a Teacher!

Huddle
Welcome to Up Front with Cabarrus Magazine, sponsored by Atlantic Bay Mortgage. Cabarrus Arena and Events Center, Cabarrus Eye Center, Certec Automotive, The Circle, A World of Wellness for Women, Code Ninjas, Concord Downtown Development Corporation, Family Wealth Partners, New Hope Worship Center and Walk Cabarrus I'm Your host, Jason Huddle. Hello my friends and welcome to another edition of Up Front with Cabarrus magazine COVID19 style podcasting from home is difficult to say the least. So in this episode and incoming episodes, if you hear loud trucks or sirens or people talking loudly in the background, please just bear with us. I tried to edit that stuff out as much as possible, but when it comes to podcasting from home, there's some things you just can't control. So I do ask you to sort of self filter that thing out. We're a couple of weeks into this thing now, and I have appreciated our last few guests. Pastor Dale Jenkins from New Hope Worship Center Congressman Richard Hudson This week we have on the program with this Jennifer Cook DeRosa. She is an author of Home Schooling for College Credit, and she has spoken all over the region on how to acquire a college education at little or no cost. Some of you may remember that she was on our program speaking about those things last July when we were doing a three part series on education, and I encourage you to go back and check that episode out. In fact, I'll put that in the show notes for you in the wake of all the schools being canceled and all these parents suddenly being thrown into the role of substitute teacher. She reached out to me and said, Look, I have some things I can offer. I have some resources, I have some tips and tricks and also for adults that are maybe looking to take this time off to further their own education. She has some ideas there, too, so I invited her on to the program. It's gonna be an awesome time with her, and I'm looking forward to our conversation before we get to that. Let's get to shameless plug time. Shall we wait? You've heard me mention on the show over the past couple weeks that we are not printing an April edition of Cabarrus magazine for obvious reasons. First of all, you're not supposed to be going out and getting them. Secondly, it's awfully hard to print a magazine and distributed when most of your distribution points are closed or not open to the public, so that becomes a problem. But we do have the digital version. It is up on our website, and I encourage you to go check it out. It's all about the changing face of Kannapolis. It is very bittersweet, as I said in my editorial this month, because I've been looking forward to presenting this issue to you since we did our editorial calendar back in the fall. Kannapolis has really overcome so much adversity, and it is truly transforming into a thriving community. Or at least it was before all these restrictions happening. And I know we're gonna bounce back, so please understand that. But in this issue, we are excited to talk about the Cannon Ballers as they moved their stadium to downtown Annapolis, changed their name from the Intimidators, and looking forward to a great season. Whenever that starts, we also talk about Old Armor Brewing Company, which is located in downtown Kannapolis. They were enjoying a lot of initial success before the restrictions happen and are still selling their product, by the way, curbside. So check out the addition for more information on that, and finally, just a general story about Kannapolis and how it started, how it's overcome so much adversity and the things that the city is doing to turn it into this thriving community that it is. So we're excited to bring that issue to you digitally. You can check it out Cabarrus Magazine dot com Please like it, share it and tell us what you think. That's only a Cabarrus Magazine dot com this month, and I look forward to hearing what you think of it. And that's this week's shameless plug time. Okay, when we come back, we will have Jennifer Cook DeRosa on the line to talk about things you can do to help get through this time of schooling your kids at home. Stay tuned.

Commercials
                 
Huddle                 
Welcome back to upfront with Embarrass magazine. As I mentioned at the top of the show several months ago, we had on Jennifer Cook DeRosa. She is the guru of all things home school and tips and tricks towards getting free or reduced college. She knows how to work the system to your advantage. And if you did not catch that episode last July, then I encourage you to do so. Jennifer laid down some great ideas for that. We even featured her in our best of 2019 episode at the end of the year. But I brought Jennifer back on, and she's on the line with us now because she realizes there are a lot of people out there that are home schooling for the first time, with no preparation, no idea what they're doing, and they're frankly freaking out about it. So Jennifer first fall. Thanks for being on the program even if it is by phone.

DeRosa
                 
Hey, I am so happy to be here. Jason, Thanks for having me back.

Huddle
                 
Of course. So, Jennifer, what are some things that you're hearing from people that are used to their Children being out of school, whether it be public or private, and now they're being forced to educate their kids. And I've heard a lot of people say they're not teachers. They don't know what they're doing, and they're a little bit freaked out about it. So what kind of words of wisdom are you offering them?

DeRosa
                 
Well, I think one of the things that everybody wants to recognize and it is gonna be really important through all of this is that there are actually legal definitions of home schooling and public school. One thing that even though we might say that we're home schooling, one thing that parents know is that they still are enrolled in public school so that their kids were still expected to meet whatever requirements that their school is setting for them. And they want to make sure that their child's teacher in principle and all of those things that you know that they're interacting with as far as the rules. If there's attendance and homework and things like that are followed because even though they might be schooling at home, home schooling is actually in a separate category. And the rules and the laws in North Carolina are different for home school versus public schools. You know, first things first. We just want to make sure that parents are are complying with what they're supposed to be doing, even though they might be schooling at home.

Huddle
                 
Okay, so what you're saying is, just because your schooling at home, you're not home schooling and I get the technical difference. But let's be frank right now. Even the public school system is relaxing their requirements. Letter just went out this past week that said, for seniors that if you were passing your classes on March 13th I believe, then congratulations, you've graduated, you're not going to be required to do anything else. So obviously they are relaxing those kind of requirements. I know that even our daughter, who is enrolled in public school and now doing some online classes now via her teacher, I know that the school is said. We can't make you do this. We can't require you to do this because not every kid has Internet access. Not everybody has the same resource is and so they've said we would like you to do this. It's beneficial for your student, but you don't have to do it. So in almost in that sense, it's a little unfair to home schoolers because home schoolers, they still have to keep doing what they're doing right.

DeRosa
                 
So home schoolers, they still would be doing what they're doing, you know? And that would be according to whatever home school policy that they're following as far as their curriculum and grades of things like that. But, you know, for the public schools, as long as the family is complying with those standards that are set up by their school, then they're good to go. I mean, they don't have to worry about that if you have a team that's already graduating, just making sure that you've done everything that this school has asked. But for those parents who may feel like, even though there aren't these requirements in place, that they may want to provide enrichment in their home for their team, there are a ton of resource is and they're not even expensive. There's a lot of free resource is, too, that they can bring into their home, especially if they want their kids doing some academics during this Corona virus.

Huddle
                 
Do you think the media has sort of overblown that concern that parents have? Or do you think it's exasperatingly parents because now it's kind of getting them freaked out a little bit about it? What what's your take on that?

DeRosa
                 
Well, I feel like it's a little bit unfair because there's there's a couple parts to this that I want to talk about. The first is that all parents are home schooling parents in the beginning, I mean, we all teacher kids, how to eat. We'll teach your kids how to brush their teeth and to wash their hands. And many parents teach your Children to read before kindergarten things like that. So we all start out as home school parents. But what happens is when we delegate that to someone else, we kind of take a back seat. And it's easy to kind of let the experts, you know, drive that ship as far as going with the public schooling and and, you know, trusting that they are making all the decisions that are going to give our kids the best education, and that's fine. So I think what happens is in a case like this where the parents are being forced back into home schooling they're not prepared for it wasn't their decision. I mean, it's kind of against their will, right? So, um, being asked all of a sudden to be responsible for something that you haven't had to be responsible for in years is overwhelming for probably everybody. Um, I know that if I had to send my kids to public school next week, it would be a change. It would certainly be an adjustment. And it would require a lot of different approaches to the way we've got things set up here in our house from our schedule and just kind of how you know how we manage our day. So I mean, I definitely get that this has upset the apple cart for everybody, but I've also, you know, heard from some parents that they're really enjoying getting to spend this time with their family. And we've had more than a handful off families decide to continue home schooling even after the Corona virus, so this could be an opportunity to test out whether or not you like home schooling as an educational choice for your family.  

Huddle
                 
What are some resource is that parents can utilize during this time if they feel like they want to supplement what the schools are sending out?

DeRosa
                 
Oh, yeah, so as far as you know, supplements, one of my absolute favorite websites is Khan Academy, and I will spell that it's Khan Academy, A C A D E M Y,  Khan Academy is a free online website. You can go on to fight and choose math, which is how that website started, but they also now have other courses and you can actually take a placement test. And then we'll assess where you are in and they'll develop kind of this. This artificial intelligence will develop a little curriculum or a learning plan view right there on the website. So whether your student is an elementary age and they're, you know, still learning their addition problems or multiplication problems all the way up through college level calculus. So it's all on there, and that is probably one of the best resource is a as far as any of the math. I would also say that instead of trying to cover all the bases to just focus on the three R's, I mean the three R's and the most important. So you have reading and you have math, which is arithmetic, and you have writing. And so if you are uncomfortable having your student do writing, that's fair. But just having them, you know, write a little bit every day. Whether it's even in a journal, very informally. Or they could, they could write a news report if they wanted, or something like that. You don't have to grade them on their grammar. You can use something that's already on your computer, like Graham early. That's a free resource. And that will give them a very basic free grammar teacher, if you will, watching over their shoulder as they do their writing and then reading. So even though our libraries air closed, you can do a lot of reading using e books, or you can go through your libraries portal and you can check books out using E books. So, you know, doing reading, writing and math every day is gonna be a great way to keep everybody on track. Keep everybody learning

Huddle
                 
Real quick before we go to break. I want to ask you about this Harvard summit that I don't know if you've heard about it. It just happened, okay? And so I think in the wake of this crisis where everybody has been forced to school their kids at home, it's brought attention, to home schooling. And now this group of people who are all obviously anti home school are getting together to, I guess, push legislators to create more strict homeschooling rules. And I'm wondering what your take is on that. And do you think that that is something that North Carolina home schooling parents have to worry about?

DeRosa
                 
Well, the Harvard Summit that referencing is a very small group of people that are making a lot of noise. And so it feels like a very big movement. It feels like it's getting a lot of media attention. Home School Legal Defense Association published on their website, you know that they're kind of watching it. But if you contacted Harvard separately and Harvard College, as well as Harvard graduate schools, they will tell you that some of their most successful students have been home schooled students. So I think one of the things that it's easy for extreme examples are these outliers that we we find these, you know, these stories where kids have been abused, which is, I think, the premise of some of these objections that believe more monitoring there would be fewer abuse cases. Now there's no question in my mind that, you know, we want to try and mitigate any of this abuse that they're talking about, but I think to call these families homeschool families there's a little bit unfair in many of the families where there have been these cases that have, really, you know, got a lot of media attention. We haven't had a case of what a student is being home schooled necessarily, brother. It's that the family's heir truant. They're not sending their kids to school, and they're using home schooling as escape goat. They're saying that their home schooling, but but they're not. Actually, I'm schooling. They're just using that as a reason and keep people from investigating what's going on in there.

Huddle
                 
That's that's their argument, though. Right is we need to be regulating and monitoring these home school families to make sure they're not doing what these other families are doing. That's the argument I'm not condoning. I'm,. I'm just saying that's the argument.

DeRosa
                 
No, that's That's a valid argument. And I think that if you use that same argument, you have to also say that you know most of these big media cases that we've seen. And you know, there's documentaries on Netflix that are going on right now. Also, these are kids that weren't schooled, these air public school kids that are still slipping through the cracks. So I don't know the best way, you know, to get rid of child abuse in the country. I wish that it were a simple a saying, You know, where you go to school is going to determine whether or not you know we can prevent child abuse. I don't think that a home school parent who's really doing a good job form schooling their family needs extra supervision. But that is a big issue. And currently, in the United States, each of the 50 states gets to determine the rules in the oversight that's required. So in some states there is quite a bit of oversight already, and in other States. There is none. But you know, as far as what's required and what kind of reporting and testing and things like that. That's a big question. It certainly is a hot topic. I don't know that I have the right answer.

Huddle
                 
Well, I think that, uh, then you get into an argument of, Well, how much oversight is the state overreaching? You know how much at what point we allow the state to start dictating how we choose to raise our children or how we choose to educate our children? You know, there are some people out there that say every child must be in a public school or a public or private school, and home schooling should be allowed it all. How much freedom are we willing to give up in the name of what's better for children as whole, you know, And I'm with you. I think some of the best students in colleges today were home schooled because they've already learned how to independently study how to motivate themselves. They don't need somebody to do that for them so but I think that's a whole another rabbit hole that we don't have time to get into because I've got to go to break. And when we come back, I want to talk about some ideas that you have during this time where we're all stuck in our houses anyway, to further our education, that lower, no costs. So can we talk about that after break?

DeRosa
                 
You bet.

Huddle
                 
All right, we're gonna cut the brake. Please stay tuned for these messages from our sponsors, and we'll be back with Jennifer Cook DeRosa In just a moment.  

Commercials
                 
Huddle                 
Thank you for staying tuned as we've been talking to Jennifer Cook DeRosa today about some tips and ideas that she had for home schooling, I should say for newly schooling at home parents who are not used to this as well as home school parents, too. And now she has some great ideas as well, because we are all stuck at home and some people are looking for things to do and and I know of. Several people have said, you know, I would like to further my education. I've always talked about getting my masters or taking this class or that class will now all this stuff is available online. Jennifer has some ideas and programs that you can tap into in order to actually do that. Since you're sitting around doing nothing, some of you So Jennifer taking away, what are some things that people could be doing to further their education?

DeRosa
                 
Oh, my gosh. So we have so many opportunities in North Carolina. North Carolina is an amazing state when it comes to earning college credit. Alternatively, and one of the things that I talked about on my block, which is home schooling for college credit dot com Airways that the home school community can begin earning college credits. So many of the things that our teenagers do through our blogged. The parents are kind of starting to take advantage of their saying, Wait a minute. If my kids, you know, in 10th grader, 11th grade in their earning college credit, I can do this, too. And so that's actually something that we're starting to see, a trend where the parents are earning college credits as well. And because of these differ alternative credit options that are available to the families in North Carolina, anyone can do it. So some of these Air four students but anybody can can do most of them, and the first thing is tapping into the community college. Now we have 58 community colleges in North Carolina, and if you're a high school graduate, the cost to do that is going to be $76 per credit. And that's pretty low for the national average. And all of the community colleges will allow you to take the courses necessary through distance learning to complete your full associates degree. Now that associates degree can transfer to one of our U. N C schools. So if you're looking at a four year degree as your target or a goal that you have, you can start through the community college, and you can earn those 1st 2 years for very, very low cost. If your student is still in high school, they can do that for free. It literally costs zero tuition for them to turn their full transfer degree through the commune Ecologist, and they can start for anyone around 11th grade. And gifted students can start 1/9 grade, so the community college should be your first stop as far as earning college credit. And you can do that online you don't have to go to campus right now, so that's the number one.

Huddle
                 
We should also mention that the College Career Promise Program they've relaxed some of the requirements to get in. There used to be a test that you had to take you to score so high and math and English I believe it was. And now they're not giving that test anymore.

DeRosa
                 
That's right. So career and college Promise is the brand name of the dual enrollment program in North Carolina. And that simply means that instead of your team taking, let's say, 12th grade English at the high school, they can take English at the community college and get credit dual credit for both. So they're getting high school credit and college credit. You used to have to be able to place into college level courses in order to do that. But now the requirement allows anyone who has a 2.8 grade point average to go ahead and enroll, and you don't have to take the placement test anymore. Now, if your ninth or 10th grader you do have to take a placement test and you have to demonstrate that they can, you know hit certain benchmarks academically. But as far as you know, just the regular courses, they could start in 11th grade.

Huddle
                 
Perfect tell us some other programs.

DeRosa
                 
Yeah, so one of my favorite programs is earning credit by exam. Credit by exam is something that we talked about previously, and the most popular credit by exam option is called Clep C L E P, and that stands for college level exam program. The way that it credit by exam works is you independently study for a subject, and that can be any way that you prefer. Whatever you're learning style is if you like to read books. If you like to watch videos and documentaries. If you like to. D'oh! You know online quizzes. However, you want to learn the information, it doesn't matter. But as soon as you I feel like you are ready, you can take some practice tests. And if you can pass the real clip exam, you can earn college credit in that subject. So, as an example, let's say that you want to study or that you've already studied American government. There is a club exam corresponds with American government, so if you can pass that test That's three college credits. And there are 33 different club exams that anyone can take to earn college credit. And our community colleges will award credit for passing scores on the club exam. Now one of the really, really cool things right now is that there is a program that's called modern states. M O D E R N S T A T E S Modern states dot or GE Modern states is an organization that is a non profit, and they have these free prep courses online. And if you go into modern states dot org's and you take a free prep course for that American government or for the United States history or four Spanish or any of those clef exams just completing that course, they will actually give you a voucher to pay for your club exam. So it literally costs nothing for college credit. And this is for adults or teens. It's for any age. You don't have to be a student anywhere. You don't have to be enrolled in college anywhere. Just anyone can go into modern states dot or GE. Take a clip prep course and get that free voucher so that as soon as the testing centers in the colleges open back up, you can go in and you can take those tests and there's no limit. You can take us many clip test says you want

Huddle
                 
Anything else to add? Jennifer, as we're getting ready to close up here on the program, is there anything else that comes to mind when when you're talking about anything that we've talked about today, whether it be new schooling at home, parents season home schooler parents or getting college credit, anything else that we've missed?

DeRosa
                 
Well, there's a couple other websites that I want to tell your listeners about. There's another organization that is currently right now offering free college credit, and they are called Sofia S. O. P. H I. A. Sofia dot or GE is a business, and their courses have been evaluated for college credit, and the kind of credit that they are evaluated for is the same type that you might get if you were in the military. But that doesn't mean you have to be in the military these air for anyone. In fact, my ninth grader, I've just switched over to using Sofia curriculum, and those courses are worth college credit at some colleges. So Sofia, that work normally charges about $325 for the class, and right now they're literally free. They've dropped the tuition to $0. So, um, if you want to earn college credit without the risk or the cost, you can go into Sofia dot organs. Start doing that. And then the other thing to notice is that if this Corona virus pushes the start gates for colleges back, or it starts to become a problem, that your teams are returning to school and you're not sure again, besides the community colleges, you should know that our schools in North Carolina our public schools, offer online degrees at the bachelors level, also at the Masters level and even if the doctorate level. So if you go to online dot North Carolina, that video that's going to allow you to do a search and you can search by the type of degree that you're looking for as well as the tuition and the tuition for residents in North Carolina is so affordable you can get a bachelor's degree in North Carolina for about $2000 anywhere between that and about $4000 depending on which program you choose and how many credits you come in with so you can start if you need to. You can start this fall and using one of the online programs that's available at one of our U. N C schools and then transition over to campus if you want to. Or you might just finish online. So we have so many options that are available to families that want to d i y their education and might need to be doing it from home online dot north Carolina dot edu and that will list every U. N C. Online program in the state. And it's searchable by degree, type by major, by location, by campus. So it's a fantastic

Huddle
                 
Just a quick note to our listeners. If you've missed any of those addresses, don't fret. Just check out the show notes. I'm gonna put all those links in the show notes, as well as a link to our previous episode with Jennifer, where we talked more in depth about the programs are available, homeschooling for college credit and things of the like. Jennifer, you are an author. Tell everybody about your book and where they can get more information about you. And the resource is that you offer

DeRosa
                 
well, thank you. Yeah, if people are interested in learning more about home schooling for college credit, I have a blogged as well as a Facebook page. Homes going for college credit dot com will take you to all of the links to the resource Is home schooling for how much credit is an organization? That's that I started in 2012 but is now run 100% by volunteers. There are 49 of us that help parents in all 50 states who are home schooling learning about college credit options. How to get those resource is and within our community. We have about 40,000 families now, and and almost all of them are earning college credit in high school, and about 90% of them are earning almost 30 college credits in high school. So it's really turned out to be a great organization. I'm very proud of it. I have written a book called Home Schooling for College. Credit is well, you can get that anywhere paperbacks Air sold amazon dot com carries it in Kindle version as well but I love, you know, speaking in North Carolina because I live here in North Carolina, I'm in the Charlotte area. So lots of of opportunities to learn more about home schooling, challenge cricket if your local speak for the Mecklenburg libraries when they're open and local conventions and conferences like that throughout the state all year.

Huddle
                 
Wonderful Jennifer Cook DeRosa author and home schooling for college credit. All knowing Guru, thank you so much for coming on the program. All right, You stay safe and healthy and to our listeners, stay tuned. We're going to wrap up the program in just a few minutes.

DeRosa
                 
Thank you.

DeRosa
                 
Atlantic Bay Mortgage Group, Cabarrus Arena and Events Center, Cabarrus Eye Center, The Circle a World of Wellness for Women, Certec Automotive, Code Ninjas, Concord Downtown Development Corporation, Family Wealth Partners, New Hope Worship Center and Walk Cabarrus. As always, please remember to support those that support us. I've been your host, Jason Huddle until next week. Keep those brains working

Like what you're reading? Subscribe to Cabarrus Magazine's free newsletter to catch every headline